EU ministers OK new cross-border data protection plan, sparking criticism

Ministers of European Union countries have agreed on a new plan to deal with cross-border privacy cases. Companies and a variety of critics, though, have called the proposal a mess.

The plan, at least originally, was supposed to put in place a “one-stop-shop” mechanism that would make it easier for businesses and citizens to deal with privacy-related complaints. The idea of a streamlined approach to resolving privacy issues is a key pillar of EU data-protection reform and member states agreed on a version of such a plan on Friday, said Vra Jourová, European Commissioner for Justice during a press conference.

At the moment, companies operating in the EU like Google, Facebook and Apple can be held responsible for privacy issues by national data protection authorities (DPAs). In Google’s case, for instance, this has led to multiple simultaneous investigations into the privacy policy it introduced in 2012. Enforcement actions related to various complaints have been taken in several EU countries.

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Story added 13. March 2015, content source with full text you can find at link above.